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IN ENGLISH previous works by the same artist Promoting your Art The Sunday Concert (Jazz) Videos Visual Jazz

THE SUNDAY CONCERT: Snarky Puppy featuring the Metropole Orkest

Wow! For this Christmas Sunday concert we have something really different that will blow your mind. 

From France´s Love @ Jazz sous les Pommiers 2015 we have this huge concert by Snarky Puppy.

This is not the Jazz you are used to listening but after a little while, it will sound as if you have been listening to it your whole life.

Enjoy!

Until next time.

Ignacio

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©2016 by Ignacio Alperin Bruvera

 

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IN ENGLISH previous works by the same artist Promoting your Art The Sunday Concert (Jazz) Videos Visual Jazz

THE SUNDAY CONCERT: B.B. King

It seems that lately we are milking Jazz Casual dry! For all of you who don’t know, Jazz Casual was an occasional 30 minute TV Jazz series on National Educational Television (NET), the predecessor to the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). The show was produced by Richard Moore on KQED in San Francisco. It ran from 1961 to 1968 and was hosted by jazz critic Ralph Gleason. This time, our Sunday concert is dedicated to the great late B.B. King.

Enjoy!

Until next time.

Ignacio

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©2016 by Ignacio Alperin Bruvera

 

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Visual Jazz

Full Article: A painter gifted with the art of listening (Florida Weekly)

A nice mix of art review, article and interview written by the prestigious Lindsey Nesmith for Florida Weekly in May. I hope you like it.

A painter gifted with the art of listening

BY LINDSEY NESMITH

lnesmith@floridaweekly.com  

FLORIDAWEEKLY12MAY16Ignacio Alperin’s exhibition “A Visual Jazz Affair” is showing at The von Liebig Center through June 3.

Synesthesia, the neurological phenomenon where the activation of one of the five senses stimulates another, could be considered to be a quirk of human evolution. Being able to smell laughter is an odd talent, but is also nothing to get worked up about if you happen to be the one person out of 2,000 who experience it.

If you’re an artist however, synesthesia can be a wonderful gift, particularly if you have an affinity for music and the ability to visualize it.

Argentinean artist Ignacio Alperin, whose exhibition “A Visual Jazz Affair” is showing at The von Liebig Center through Friday, June 3, is so blessed: He “sees” music as he hears it. His work is often compared to that of Kandinsky, who he learned also experienced sound-tocolor synesthesia. 

Works by Ignacio Alperin on display at The von Liebig Art Center through June 3 include, clockwise from above left, “Paper Moon,” “Whatever Lola Wants” and “Kind of Blue (and Ochre Too).”

Visitors to The von Liebig exhibit can tune in to the music that inspired several of the paintings in “A Visual Jazz Affair” by scanning a QR code next to the painting and listening through their smartphones.

An ardent love for American jazz, which Mr. Alperin discovered as a child, served as inspiration for the current show.

“People always say there is something musical and rhythmic about the paintings; that there seems to be sound coming out of them,” he says. “It allows my brain to produce shapes and colors with music.”

His paintings certainly do evoke a certain musicality, particularly when viewed alongside the jazz piece he selected to accompany each piece. In “Kind of Blue (and Ochre Too),” for example, viewers can see the syncopation and meditative groove Miles Davis infuses into his cool jazz era recordings. But Mr. Alperin says he didn’t simply transcribe onto canvas the shapes he saw when he listened to “Kind of Blue.” His painting, he says, “is more like a general reference to the album and a feeling. It was a groundbreaking album, and if you look at the painting, you can see how the perspective is breaking up.”

 cards naples  polaroid kind of bueand ochre tooAnother painting, “Whatever Lola Wants,” features a chaotic space and broken perspective centered on a zaftig female figure. Not exactly the self-contained maneater described in “Whatever Lola Wants,” but rather a meditation on Lola come undone.

“This is stormy Lola,” he says. “Lola is wild.”

Visitors to the exhibit will also see six pieces that demonstrate the reverse painting technique, in which Mr. Alperin paints in backward order on the backside of plexiglass. Canvas paintings are layered in such a way that an artist’s first stroke lays the foundation of the work, whereas reverse painting requires that the first stroke be in the foreground and integral element of the composition. “Paper Moon” is one of the plexiglass paintings on display.

“It’s much more restrictive,” he says. “I cannot change what I did first. It has to be thought out.”

The advantage, however, is seeing how the light creates a dimensionality not typically found on canvas when it can pass through the glass and layers of paint. “The colors come alive,” he says. “All that third dimensionality comes up when the light bounces off it.”

Mr. Alperin’s works have been exhibited throughout the world, including London, New York, Miami, Melbourne, Zurich, Lisbon and in Argentina, where he is a professor of creativity and innovation at The Argentine National Catholic University in Buenos Aires.

The artist grew up in Australia and says when his parents took him on an extended trip to Europe as a child, he came home painting after having been to practically every art museum on the continent.

He was childhood friends with Nichaud Fitzgibbons, who became one of Australian’s premiere jazz musicians. At the time, however, her father, Smacka Fitzgibbons, was at the forefront of the music scene, and she knew all the musicians.

“I became hooked on jazz, and it has followed me all my life,” Mr. Alperin says. “I have high respect for the genre … it’s America’s best gift to the world in the 20th century.” ¦

‘A Visual Jazz Affair’

>> What: An exhibit of works by Ignacio Alperin, several of which the viewer studies while listening to the jazz music that inspired them

>> When: Through Friday, June 3

>> Where: The von Liebig Art Center

> Hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Saturday       

IGNACIO ALPERIN: THE ART OF THINKING OUT LOUD / EL ARTE DE PENSAR EN VOZ ALTA

BY LINDSEY NESMITH

Ignacio Alperin’s exhibition “A Visual Jazz Affair” is showing at The von Liebig Center through June 3.  Synesthesia, the neurological phenomenon where the activation of one of the five senses stimulates another, could be considered to be a quirk of human evolution. Being able to smell laughter is an odd talent, but is also nothing Works by Ignacio Alperin on display at The von Liebig Art Center through June 3 include, clockwise from above left, “Paper Moon,” “Whatever Lola Wants” and “Kind of Blue (and Ochre Too).” to get worked up about if you happen to be the one person out of 2,000 who experience it.

If you’re an artist however, synesthesia can be a wonderful gift, particularly if you have an affinity for music and the ability to visualize it.

Argentinean artist Ignacio Alperin, whose exhibition “A Visual Jazz Affair” is showing at The von Liebig Center through Friday, June 3, is so blessed: He “sees” music as he hears it. His work is often compared to that of Kandinsky, who he learned also experienced sound-to-color synesthesia.

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IN ENGLISH previous works by the same artist Promoting your Art The Sunday Concert (Jazz) Videos Visual Jazz

THE SUNDAY CONCERT: Jazz at the White House 2016

Just in case you missed it, this Sunday we have a great Jazz Day concert, at none other than the White House. From April 30th, 2016.

Enjoy!

Until next time.

Ignacio

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©2016 by Ignacio Alperin Bruvera

 

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Creativity / Creatividad Design IN ENGLISH jazz

So, it seems we need new talent here…

CREATIVITY

We usually talk respectfully about “talented” individuals, companies look for “new talent”, while the media reviews and applauds “talented” performers. Some of us may have even dreamt -or may still hope- to be in consideration for that label. And why not? It would seem people openly considered as “talented” have the world at their feet. But what is really talent? Or at least, what qualifies as talent in these situations? Furthermore, is there such a thing as a “talented individual”?

Merriam-Webster defines talent, in this particular usage, as “1. archaic :  a characteristic feature, aptitude, or disposition of a person or animal, 2.  the natural endowments of a person; and 3. a special often athletic, creative, or artistic aptitude or b :  general intelligence or mental power :  ability.”



The first obvious thought that comes to mind from looking at the definition, is that it is a very misused word. Clearly, it is one of those expressions in common usage that has become a generic term in itself. And just as for most people around the world the name Coke is a generic term (a definition in itself) as much as a brand, the everyday use of the brand Talent generates a common and accepted image no matter whether we are talking about sports, business, science, or a spelling bee competition.

Yet, moving beyond the superficial -and maybe misleading- use of the specific term, it remains so that “talent” is not something as special as one may have been led to believe. Quite the contrary, having talents seems to be as much an intrinsic part of an individual as, let’s say, being creative, having body organs or breathing.

The fact is that we all have received talents from the word go. They are our natural endowments, using the description of Merriam-Webster. They can be both our genetic (family), and personal (individual) gifts. Capacities that make up as much of who we are as any other personal characteristic. It is the stuff we are good at, as well as the things we suspect we could be good at if we gave it a serious try, those we suspect are there but we need to give ourselves the opportunity -and time- to explore them, and even those which are hidden from us and we don´t even know exist.

b&wmod.jpgIn the same way as it used to be said that only some people were talented, the same happened with creative people. These days we can say – backed by strong neurological and psychological evidence, as well as with at least 100 years of relevant scientific research-, that in fact, “we are all creative”. What we are not is all “the same creative”. In a way, and in reference to “talent”, the same thing seems to apply.

So, what makes some people raise above others then? How come we generally recognize that, even if we are all talented, some may seem to be more so than others (following Orwell´s Animal Farm line of thought that “we are all equal, but some are more equal than others” perhaps). And what makes them more noticeable than the rest?

There are clearly common qualities that spread across the different professions and which can be analyzed. In simple terms, an approximation to the “Famous Talents” Top 10 checklist could look a bit like this:

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  1. Most of them put in the work. There is hard labor behind all that “talent”. 8 hours a day is just for suckers.
  2. They study a lot. These are not lazy people touched by a magic wand. They usually need to know much more than what they need to use. These people are encyclopedic, even if sometimes only in very specific areas.
  3. They don´t mind emulating. Everything is -more or less- a remix. They know it, and they are all out to learn from the best.
  4. They produce the goods. Others with similar talents may be just waiting for that lucky break. These people are all about getting the breaks by producing, and producing, and producing…
  5. They are “out there” (in a wide mode or in a subject specific mode, but out there). They work their marketing tools to the hilt. They are socially active and, if applicable, also on social media. They love followers and search for more. They know they were lucky to get into the spotlight, but they also know that for luck to find them, they had to work hard and be visible.
  6. They know when they are onto a good thing. Repetition makes perfect so they all have their war horses and ride them to the end.
  7. There is an “aura” about them. Whether purposely or naturally, most of them will pursue nonchalant, detached, and understated manners and ways that make other people feel in the presence of “some kind of intellectual/sporting/artistic/(you name it) royalty”. Others will go for the opposite -loud and annoying- effect, and even if successful, the other “talents” will see them as simple “flashes in effect ridden pans”.
  8. They are extremely demanding, of themselves and of others. You were just complaining about a boyfriend/girlfriend? If you think they are demanding, it’s because you have seen nothing yet. These people wrote the book!
  9. They are markedly creative and feed their creative instincts constantly. Noticeably talented individuals are noticeably creative individuals. And they always let you know about it.
  10. They are all thinking about the day after. Not the day after the project, the movie, the book, or the election. They are all thinking about the day after they die. Their drive is rocketed by the hope of achieving some type of relative  immortality. They are working hard at getting their permanent stamp on their specific world, and this is a driving force that pushes them quite a few extra miles.

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So, on the one hand, talent is everywhere (in human and animal terms and without exception). In our specific case, wherever there is a human being (and today with 7 billion plus on the planet, that is almost everywhere) there is talent, obvious or latent. But also in society, there are those who clearly will go the extra distance and be lucky enough to be noticed, be formally labelled, and get the benefits from being openly considered as “a Talent”.

Whether we are looking to reboot our natural talents, or to either retain or hire what is commonly referred to as “new talent”, it is very possible that many of these 10 qualities we just mentioned are expected to be found (they are obviously not the only ones). So, it may be a smart move to look at the manner in which many of these people work and act. Emulating them, working hard, liberating our creative spirits, and remixing a little, may then get us a long way.

Until next time!

Ignacio

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©2016 by Ignacio Alperin Bruvera

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IN ENGLISH previous works by the same artist Promoting your Art The Sunday Concert (Jazz) Videos Visual Jazz

THE SUNDAY CONCERT: Bola Sete & the Vince Guiraldi Trio

Again from Jazz Casual, this time it is the great Brazilian guitarist Bola Sete with the Vince Guiraldi Trio playing live many of the songs that appeared on Vince Guaraldi, Bola Sete and Friends, a collaboration between pianist Vince Guaraldi and guitarist Bola Sete, released in 1963 through Fantasy Records.

Enjoy!

Until next time.

Ignacio

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©2016 by Ignacio Alperin Bruvera